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Nicole Samson headshot

Nicole Samson

Nicole Samson headshot

Nicole Samson

City Council - At Large

Survey Score: 65%


Candidate has completed the survey! (see results)

Colorado Rising
Lafayette Candidates Candidate Score Card


Q:

Will you commit to refusing campaign contributions from fossil fuel companies?

A:

Yes

Q:

Do you agree that the continued proliferation of oil and gas extraction is a major contributor to the climate crisis?

A:

Yes

Q:

Do you pledge to support/advance policies that protect communities from the cumulative impacts of climate change?

A:

Yes

Q:

If you answered "Yes" to the above question, how will you protect communities?

A:

City Council can support programs that incentivize energy efficient buildings, construct affordable housing near public transit stops, build bike lanes and trail connections that allow people to walk and bike throughout the community. Lafayette has begun a sustainability plan to identify and assess options that will help the community and its residents to increase the quality of our air, water and climate.

Q:

Do you support state Senate Bill 19-181 which grants local governments authority over oil & gas operations within their jurisdiction?

A:

Yes

Q:

Do you believe that local governments should have the right to enact bans or moratoria on fracking to safeguard residents from the inherent dangers associated with oil & gas development?

A:

Yes

A:

The Lafayette City Council recently extended the moratorium so we can continue discussions with our neighboring cities and Boulder County on surface impact regulations and to make sure our community policy aligns with the regulation changes at the state level

Q:

Did you support Proposition 112, which aimed to create 2500 foot setbacks for homes, schools, hospitals, parks, playgrounds and water sources from all new oil & gas operations?

A:

No

Q:

If you answered "no" to the above, why not?

A:

2500 feet would have been essentially a state-wide ban on oil and gas production. We were and are not ready to eliminate all sources of energy. We did not/do not have renewable sources in place and ready to go for all people. However, this proposition was beneficial, because it made us think about what steps our society needs to take in order to live on 100% non-carbon energy. For example, all our homes need to be powered through other fuel sources. Companies need to allow telecommuting, and/or have daycare facilities onsite, and/or employees need to be living within biking distance of work or near public transportation. Colleges need to reduce the cost to take online classes, which are higher than on-campus classes. We need to address issues like the cost of housing around transit oriented sites, which is more expensive than homes further away from public transportation. We need to work to reduce the cost to use/install solar, wind, or geothermal energy. We are going to have to get more creative on how to deal with barriers to becoming completely sustainable on non-carbon energy. For example, how do we help people with jobs, like roofing or management of satellite offices, which require them to be physically at different sites across a community, region or state each week. Overall, we need to continue to change the way we operate, work and live first.

Q:

Do you agree that the COGCC should pause all new permits for oil & gas development until the new rule-making process is complete and an independent cumulative impact study has been done?

A:

No

Q:

Will you advocate for state agencies and the oil and gas industry to abide by the precautionary principle in order to protect Colorado’s air, water, and public health?

A:

Yes

Q:

What are your specific plans to reduce the threat of climate change once you get into office?

A:

We need to work to transition to renewable energy. This will only happen if everyone takes steps to reduce and eliminate their dependency on oil and gas. Efforts to increase awareness of what individuals can do every day to be successful in this goal will make a difference, such as purchasing items made of natural fibers or recycled materials, reusing materials, telecommuting into work (if allowed), carpooling, riding a bicycle, or walking to activities. City Council can support programs that take community-wide steps to move us toward healthy and safe energy sources.

Q:

What will you do to attract other environmentally friendly industries such as hemp, solar, wind, geothermal?

A:

See answer #9.