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Jessica Troy headshot

Jessica Troy

Jessica Troy headshot

Jessica Troy

City Council - Ward 3

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Colorado Rising
Thornton Candidates Candidate Score Card


Q:

Will you commit to refusing campaign contributions from fossil fuel companies?

A:

Yes

Q:

Do you agree that the continued proliferation of oil and gas extraction is a major contributor to the climate crisis?

A:

Yes

Q:

Do you pledge to support/advance policies that protect communities from the cumulative impacts of climate change?

A:

Yes

Q:

If you answered "Yes" to the above question, how will you protect communities?

A:

We need to do a lot of things and have not very much time to do it. I feel particularly called towards building the infrastructure needed as a city to make the transition away from fossil fuels. This means systemic changes to city design to make our community less car dependent, less sprawling, more energy efficient, and more primed for alternative energy. We need to start investing in and installing alternative energy now. And we need to look at conserving our resources and mitigating the impacts of climate change in our design as well, such as reducing our urban heat island effect by utilizing more plants in the city (particularly trees and shrubs) but ensuring that all landscaping is low water use/xeric in order to conserve water.

Q:

Do you support state Senate Bill 19-181 which grants local governments authority over oil & gas operations within their jurisdiction?

A:

Yes

Q:

Do you believe that local governments should have the right to enact bans or moratoria on fracking to safeguard residents from the inherent dangers associated with oil & gas development?

A:

Yes

A:

I am very supportive of a straight out ban, but also am willing to consider other measures that will accomplish the same feats. However, I want to make sure that when we are banning fracking in Thornton, we are not just pushing it into poorer communities.

Q:

Did you support Proposition 112, which aimed to create 2500 foot setbacks for homes, schools, hospitals, parks, playgrounds and water sources from all new oil & gas operations?

A:

Yes

Q:

Do you agree that the COGCC should pause all new permits for oil & gas development until the new rule-making process is complete and an independent cumulative impact study has been done?

A:

Yes

Q:

Will you advocate for state agencies and the oil and gas industry to abide by the precautionary principle in order to protect Colorado’s air, water, and public health?

A:

Yes

Q:

What are your specific plans to reduce the threat of climate change once you get into office?

A:

I plan to make significant changes to city planning in Thornton. Right now we are a highly car dependent city, which not only contributes to climate change, but it is hostile to small business, harmful to public health, makes affordable housing solutions harder, and places a tremendous financial burden on many working families. We need denser, more walkable, mixed use development in Thornton, which allows for more transportation options, more efficient living situations, more access to a variety of housing options to fit more financial needs, and boosts economic activity. People need to be able to live near where they work, and they shouldn't have to be an athlete to get around their community without a car. We need to make sure that we have the space and the resources to accommodate the likely millions of climate refugees we will be seeing over the next several decades. And we need to make sure our built environment is prepared to weather the upcoming extreme climate events that are already locked in from the amount of damage we have already done to the climate.

Q:

What will you do to attract other environmentally friendly industries such as hemp, solar, wind, geothermal?

A:

This is a top priority of mine, because I would like to out compete the oil and gas industry by first of all reducing the demand for their project (as tiny an impact that changing the design of one city has, its bigger than the push for individual reduction), but also to boost up their competitors in the energy market. I think the city of Thornton should look into using the kinds of tax breaks we have previously given to places like Amazon and Top Golf to attract alternative energy companies into our city. Also, just using their products and designing our city in modern, sustainable ways (as opposed to sprawling like it's 1992), will make our city a more attractive place for these types of industries and the types of workers they seek to employ. I intend to see what else can be done to court these companies once I am in office.