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Heidi Henkel headshot

Heidi Henkel

Heidi Henkel headshot

Heidi Henkel

City Council - Ward 5

Survey Score: 100%


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Colorado Rising
Broomfield Candidates Candidate Score Card


Q:

Will you commit to refusing campaign contributions from fossil fuel companies?

A:

Yes

Q:

Do you agree that the continued proliferation of oil and gas extraction is a major contributor to the climate crisis?

A:

Yes

Q:

Do you pledge to support/advance policies that protect communities from the cumulative impacts of climate change?

A:

Yes

Q:

If you answered "Yes" to the above question, how will you protect communities?

A:

It's no secret that our climate is getting consistently warmer and that our city and county have to be prepared for this. Whether it's flooding, fire, drought, or other extremes, we should be making plans for the effects of climate change. In Broomfield, I feel that those who are in a lower socioeconomic level would be affected first by climate change. By requiring communal shelters in mobile home parks and taking a close look at any tax breaks that park owners receive and directing that extra revenue toward emergency management and public safety efforts would be helpful for our residents. Emergency plans in both Spanish and English would be important. In the North side of Broomfield, we have the last parts of build out for Broomfield and we have a say in how the community is designed, to be more preventative. We also have a new community-based civic center that could be designed with the effects of climate change in mind as well. A big part of this is how we increase vegetation, which would decrease temperatures compared to hard surfaces, and bring in more community gardens. We also could use more xeriscaping, which is more drought-resistant, and resilient. For buildings, we could use lighter colored roofs to reduce temperatures, which also lowers demand for air conditioning. We could also modify our zoning and building codes to be more resilient to higher temperatures and drastic changes in weather.

Q:

Do you support state Senate Bill 19-181 which grants local governments authority over oil & gas operations within their jurisdiction?

A:

Yes

Q:

Do you believe that local governments should have the right to enact bans or moratoria on fracking to safeguard residents from the inherent dangers associated with oil & gas development?

A:

Yes

A:

Broomfield has a local city and county charter 301 law that our current council is not leveraging. This law specifically says that health and safety must be elevated when it comes to oil and gas exploration, and that there must be no adverse impacts. We can utilize this law under SB 181, keeping the precautionary principle at the helm of all decisions to include cumulative impacts of climate change. I am fully aware and understand that there are over 1,700 studies where 84% point towards harm and Broomfield, and our climate, deserves to have their local law adhered to consistently and closely.

Q:

Did you support Proposition 112, which aimed to create 2500 foot setbacks for homes, schools, hospitals, parks, playgrounds and water sources from all new oil & gas operations?

A:

Yes

Q:

Do you agree that the COGCC should pause all new permits for oil & gas development until the new rule-making process is complete and an independent cumulative impact study has been done?

A:

Yes

Q:

Will you advocate for state agencies and the oil and gas industry to abide by the precautionary principle in order to protect Colorado’s air, water, and public health?

A:

Yes

Q:

What are your specific plans to reduce the threat of climate change once you get into office?

A:

First, Broomfield needs to publicly acknowledge the climate crisis and education must be a priority. I have already helped initiate our city and county’s first ever “Climate Conversations” event with guest speakers Mike Nelson, Trish Zornio, Scott Denning, and Mayor Kris Larsen in 2018 with over 280 people in attendance. I have also paved the way to action by receiving my Climate Reality Leadership training in Los Angeles in 2018 as well. I led the charge on pressing our city and county to start a sustainability task force that addresses carbon emissions. We need sustainable energy benchmarking and a greenhouse gas emissions study, with supplementation to categorize sources and volumes of emissions and identify data for energy savings policies. We also need to establish when, not if, we become 100% renewable. I also hope to partner with other local government allies with Colorado Communities for Climate Action, to advocate for climate friendly policies at the state legislature and key agencies as well. Although we can be strong on our own, we are much stronger together.

Q:

What will you do to attract other environmentally friendly industries such as hemp, solar, wind, geothermal?

A:

With our new Environmental Stewardship Advisory Task Force getting some legs this year, I would first extend their original 1 year plan and make this a continuous board. This task force has already started to collaborate for a grant to give $1,000/household incentives for solar. If we collaborate with other places like Northglenn and Westminster, we can develop a co-op. I would also look into zoning for industrial hemp for land use as hemp is great at carbon sequestration, phytoremediation to clean contaminated soils, and producing CDB and bioplastics (among other things), and I would want to encourage the small businesses when it comes to hemp farmers with any issues that may arise. I also think, to add to this list, plans to wean Broomfield off the use of gas. The Netherlands is already starting to do this, and is planning to phase out of natural gas by 2050, but it would take an overhaul of our systems and a comprehensive plan to do so. I do believe in diversifying our energy sources and am open to continuing that conversation.